The Supreme Court Weighs In On Trump Being Removed From The Ballot

When it comes to whether or not Trump should appear on presidential ballots, there are at least two questions to consider.

The first is legal — does the 14th amendment apply him?

The second is practical. What would happen if Trump WERE removed from the ballot?

How might his tens of millions of supporters respond?

At a rally last month, the former President suggested if he doesn’t get what he views as “fair” treatment, the country is in big trouble.

This week the Supreme Court will weigh whether Donald Trump is constitutionally ineligible to be president.

We hear from a legal scholar who says it could be the beginning of a, “bloody unraveling of democratic norms.”

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America’s Immigration System Is Broken. Congress Can’t Seem To Fix It.

The U.S. Immigration system isn’t working. The last significant reform was in 1986. Presidents and Congress have been trying to fix it and change it ever since.

Congress is at it again, but that effort, like so many others, looks doomed to fail. Just a few hours after the text from the Senate bipartisan bill dropped, Speaker of The House Mike Johnson said IF the bill reaches the house – it will be DEAD on arrival. And on Monday night GOP support for the legislation in the Senate seemed to all but fade away.

As the Senate gets ready to vote on yet another attempt to address immigration in the U.S, we look at why the effort to fix America’s broken immigration system fails across decades, administrations and parties.

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East Palestine Residents Worry About Safety A Year After Devastating Train Derailment

It was a year ago this month that a Norfolk Southern freight train with 38 cars derailed in East Palestine, Ohio.

Twenty of those train cars carried hazardous materials. In the days after the crash officials, decided to burn off one of those hazardous materials, vinyl chloride. The burn and massive plume of smoke it created caused environmental problems and concerns about the health and safety of residents.

A year after that devastating derailment and chemical burn the train company Norfolk Southern and the EPA say the air and water are safe.

The people who have to go on living there aren’t so sure.

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What Vision Zero Has And Hasn’t Accomplished

More than 100 people are killed on U.S. roads every day — more than 40,000 people a year. So, it seemed bold, if not crazy, when city leaders across the country began to set their sights on eliminating traffic fatalities completely.

It has now been 10 years since U.S. cities began to adopt the approach known as Vision Zero.

NPR’s Joel Rose reports on what has worked and what hasn’t.

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Masturbation Abstinence Is Popular, And Doctors Are Worried

More than two decades of growing internet use has surfaced fears about the social and psychological impacts of nearly unfettered access to pornography. But many researchers and sex therapists worry that the online communities that have formed in response to these fears often endorse inaccurate medical information, exacerbate mental health problems and, in some cases, overlap with extremist and hate groups.

NPR’s Lisa Hagen speaks about her reporting with NPR’s Ayesha Rascoe.

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Violent Crime Is Dropping, But Americans Feel Less Safe.

For people in the US, 2020 was one of the most dangerous years in decades. The first year of the pandemic saw a huge spike in violence. The number of homicides in the country rose about 30 percent from 2019.

Fast forward a couple of years – and things look very different. According to crime analyst Jeff Asher, “2023 featured one of the lowest rates of violent crime in the US in more than 50 years.”

In big cities and small, from the East coast to the West, violence has dropped dramatically.

Despite a significant and measurable drop in violent crime, Americans feel less safe. According to a Gallup poll released in November, more than three quarters of Americans believe there’s more crime in the country than there was last year.

We explore the reasons why the good news on crime isn’t getting through.

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Is Fox News Still A Republican Kingmaker?

Fox News has been the Republican Party’s biggest cheerleader almost since it premiered in 1996.

Nearly three decades later, many Republicans perceive Fox as the de facto kingmaker for all kinds of Republican candidates — including presidential.

That kingmaker status brought Fox News power, ratings and billions in profits and has spawned a succession of imitators and competition.

But for Fox, that synergy with Trump and the Republicans has come with significant risk and significant consequences.

Dominion Voting Systems sued Fox for defamation after network anchors amplified Trump’s false election claims. The company settled, at a cost of nearly $790 million.

Nevertheless, Fox News still has the power to shape Republican politics as the country heads into another presidential election cycle. But is that power diminished in 2024?

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Impeaching Mayorkas: High Crimes and Misdemeanors Or Politics As Usual?

Immigration and management of the U.S. Southern Border is always a politically charged issue, but especially at this moment.

House republicans are trying to advance articles of impeachment against Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. They say he has refused to comply with the law and has breached the trust of the public.

Meanwhile President Biden is describing the U.S. immigration system as broken.

All this is playing out as a government funding bill is tied to the border and a presidential election is months away.