The evolution of Pride

More than 50 years of Pride marches, parades, festivals, and now partnership deals with major brands has increased LGBTQ visibility and community. And as a result, it’s also made Pride the target of a backlash.

Host Scott Detrow speaks with Eric Marcus, the creator of the podcast “Making Gay History” about how Pride has evolved into what it is today.

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Biden tries to reassure voters after a shaky debate performance

The day after a debate in which he faltered many times, President Joe Biden hit the campaign trail to try and reassure supporters that he is still up for the job and capable of beating former President Donald Trump in November.

His performance in the CNN debate on Thursday led many Democrats to panic about his chances of winning reelection. Some commentators who have long supported Biden even called for him to step aside.

NPR’s Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior White House Correspondent Tamara Keith and Congressional Correspondent Deirdre Walsh about what happens next and whether Biden can quell Democrats’ fears.

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Gun violence is getting worse. Is this the solution?

The surgeon general’s office has declared gun violence a national public health crisis.

It’s the first time the body has ever issued a public health advisory about firearms, and for Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, it’s a step in reframing the conversation about death by gunfire.

According to the CDC, more than 48,000 Americans were killed by gun violence in 2021, and over half of those deaths were by suicide.

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Biden’s executive actions on immigration send mixed signals

In early June, President Joe Biden severely restricted asylum requests from migrants attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border without authorization.

Two weeks later, the President struck a more welcoming tone, saying he’d protect hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants married to U.S. citizens.

Immigration has become a big issue, for both parties. Policy experts say Biden hopes that in a close election year, these executive actions will sway voters to his side.

But will that strategy pay off and how will it affect migrants?

NPR’s Adrian Florido speaks with immigration correspondent Jasmine Garsd who is reporting from the San Diego border with Mexico.

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The U.S. election results will reverberate around the world

Polls – and NPR’s own reporting – tell a story of many Americans fatigued by the upcoming presidential race. They’re not satisfied with the choice between two men who have both already held the office of President.

But American allies and partners are watching the race intently, including South Korea, Japan, Ukraine and Israel. The fates of those countries are closely tied to whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden ends up sitting in the White House next year.

The NPR correspondents who cover those countries, Anthony Kuhn in South Korea, Joanna Kakissis in Ukraine, and Daniel Estrin in Israel, discuss the stakes each of those countries have in the outcome of America’s presidential election.

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Federal student aid still up in the air for many

This year’s college application process was supposed to get easier.

That’s because last year, the U.S. Department of Education announced changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The problems with the FAFSA form began last fall.

And with August and September around the corner, some applicants continue to experience technical issues.

Before this year, students would already know how much aid they’re getting. But in 2024, not knowing, which is the case for many, could mean they can’t go to college.

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