DACA Recipients On Ten Years Of Precarious Protection

It’s been ten years since the Obama administration announced Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The policy provided protection from deportation for hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children.

President Obama called it a “temporary stopgap measure,” at the time, but Congress hasn’t passed any legislation in the intervening years to create permanent protection for the people covered by DACA.

Last year, a federal judge in Texas ruled the program is illegal, and the program is essentially frozen in place while the Biden administration appeals. Current DACA recipients can reapply, but the administration can’t grant any new applications. NPR’s Joel Rose reports that that has left roughly 80,000 DACA applications indefinitely on hold.

Two early DACA recipients and advocates for undocumented immigrants, Diana Pliego and Esder Chong, discuss how they view the program, on its tenth anniversary.

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The Emerging Deal On Gun Violence: Is It Enough?

A bipartisan group of Senates say they have reached a deal on a package of safety and gun-related measures. The deal is not yet done, but lawmakers say they are closer than they’ve been in a long time.

The package includes measures to enhance background checks for gun buyers under 21, incentivize states to pass so-called “red flag laws,” and fund school safety and mental health initiatives. Is it enough? We put that question to Gabby Giffords, a former congresswoman who was injured in a 2011 shooting. Since then, Giffords has dedicated her life to calling for action on gun control, co-founding Giffords, an advocacy group that promotes gun safety. The group’s executive director, Peter Ambler, also spoke to NPR.

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Inflation Is Not Getting Better. Why Some CEOs Are Predicting Recession

Prices rose more than expected in May. Gas is averaging $5 a gallon. Food, rent, and housing all cost more, too. NPR’s Scott Horsley spoke to consumers trying to cope.

Some CEOs are predicting a recession — but not all. NPR’s David Gura reports.

Additional reporting in this episode from NPR’s Chris Arnold on the growing cost of housing. Transportation company owner Dennis Briggs spoke to NPR’s Ayesha Rascoe on Weekend Edition Sunday.

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Is the U.S. Moving Closer to Erasing All Federal Student Loans?

After years of struggling to pay federal student loans used to attend the for-profit Corinthian Colleges, hundreds of thousands of student borrowers will have their debt canceled. Corinthian closed in 2015 after investigators found it had defrauded students with misleading claims about future job prospects. Earlier this month, The Department of Education discharged all outstanding debt for all Corinthian borrowers.

With over a trillion dollars owed, federal student loan debt has been called a national crisis. Advocates for the cancellation of all federal student loans hope the Department of Education’s latest move could signal a step in that direction.

We speak with political strategist and student loan cancellation advocate Melissa Byrne.

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January 6th hearings begin, with a focus on the Proud Boys

On Thursday, the House Select Committee investigating the January 6th insurrection at the U.S. Capitol began presenting its findings in the first in a series of high profile public hearings. The panel showed videos of aides to former President Trump testifying that his claims of a stolen election were simply not true. Some used more colorful language.

The committee seeks to show that the mayhem at the Capitol was not spontaneous, but rather an orchestrated subversion of American democracy. And they say former President Trump was a key player.

The hearing also included video of the Proud Boys at the Capitol on the day of the attack. We speak to documentary filmmaker Nick Quested who shot some of that footage and testified before the committee on Thursday.

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With Gas Prices Still Soaring, Electric Cars Meet A Moment

There have never been more options for drivers who want an electric car. But the demand — fueled by high gas prices — is almost over-powering, and supply chain constraints aren’t helping.

NPR’s Brittany Cronin reports on one of the biggest EV launches of the year: Ford’s F-150 Lightning. NPR’s Camila Domonoske explains why China dominates the market for electric car batteries.

Also in this episode: General Motors President Mark Reuss, who spoke to NPR’s Steve Inskeep on Morning Edition.

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A First Step To Crypto Regulation, Or A Step Backwards?

Nearly everyone agrees the cryptocurrency industry needs regulation, but there are huge disagreements about what that should look like.

A Senate bill proposes a new regulatory framework for the industry. Cosponsors Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyoming) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) argue that their bill hits the “sweet spot” between allowing innovation and protecting consumers.

Software engineer Molly White, who runs the blog Web3 is going just great, says that the bill is too industry-friendly, and puts into legislation the “foggy regulatory space” that crypto companies have taken advantage of.

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As Lawmakers Debate Gun Control, What Policies Could Actually Help?

President Biden urged Congress to act and the House is preparing to pass multiple gun control measures. But the Senate is where a compromise must be made. A bipartisan group of lawmakers is reportedly discussing policies like enhanced background checks and a federal red flag law.

While it’s unclear what Congress might agree to, researchers do have ideas about what policies could help prevent mass shootings and gun violence. NPR’s Nell Greenfieldboyce explains. Hear more from her reporting on Short Wave, NPR’s daily science podcast, via Apple, Google, or Spotify.

NPR’s Cory Turner reports on what school safety experts think can be done to prevent mass shootings, and former FBI agent Katherine Schweit describes where Uvalde police may have erred their active shooter response. Schweit is the author of Stop the Killing: How to End the Mass Shooting Crisis.

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New White House COVID Czar: ‘Less Fear Is A Good Thing’

In the third summer of the pandemic, White House COVID response coordinator Ashish Jha tells NPR it’s a good thing that many people feel less afraid of getting sick. But he says the Biden administration still has work to do.

One of their latest challenges is managing the vaccine rollout for children under 5, which could begin in weeks — and educating parents and caretakers about the importance of vaccination.

NPR’s Rob Stein reports on another persistent public health challenge: long COVID. A recent study offers some clues about why many people suffer from symptoms for months. Rob also spoke to Gregory Glenn of Novavax, who you’ll hear in this episode discussing the company’s new COVID vaccine, which is awaiting FDA authorization.

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As School Shootings Claim More Victims, Young Activists Want to Be Heard

The mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX has parents and students worried about safety at school. Data gathered by the Washington Post estimates that more than 300,000 students have experienced shootings at school since the 1999 school shooting in Columbine, Colorado. But experts say the impact of school shootings is far more extensive, and even children who don’t come into direct contact with violence can be traumatized.

We speak with Hannah Rubin, a 16-year-old activist with March for Our Lives, a youth-led movement pushing for gun control measures.

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