Children Are Grieving. Here’s How One Texas School District Is Trying to Help

It’s been more than a year now since many kids across the country returned to their classrooms.

And many of them brought grief and trauma with them, too.

But some educators just don’t feel equipped to support kids who are grieving.

NPR’s Rhitu Chatterjee speaks with a handful of school mental health professionals who recently attended a special training on grief and trauma.

Also in this episode, NPR’s Eric Deggans speaks with a psychologist on collective trauma in the wake of mass shootings.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Punishing Player Misconduct: Will the NFL Ever Get it Right?

On Sunday, Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson will return to the field for the first time in nearly two years. This comes after an 11-game suspension and $5 million fine imposed by the NFL after more than two dozen female massage therapists filed allegations against him ranging from sexual misconduct to sexual assault.

The allegations stem from incidents that occurred in 2020 and 2021, while Watson was a quarterback for the Houston Texans. And while he doesn’t face criminal charges, the sheer number of women coming forward with similar accounts is striking – but not, striking enough to deter Cleveland from signing Watson -in time for the 2022 season -with a five-year $230 million deal

The NFL has faced criticism in the past for how it handles cases like Watson’s, and many critics say the fine and suspension don’t go far enough.

Host Michel Martin speaks with Kevin Blackstione, a sports columnist for the Washington Post and ESPN panelist, about how the NFL might better handle allegations of player misconduct against women.

Twitter’s Safety Chief Quit. Here’s Why.

It didn’t take long for Elon Musk’s stated vision for Twitter—a “digital town square” where all legal speech flows freely—to run head long into reality. Namely, the fact that many citizens of that town square want to share inaccurate, racist or violent ideas.

Yoel Roth used to lead the team that set the rules for what was allowed on Twitter, and aimed to keep users safe. Not long after Musk took over the company, Roth quit.

In an interview, he explains why he left and what he thinks is ahead for the company.

This episode also features reporting from NPR’s Shannon Bond.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

China’s Outspoken Generation

The protests in China may have been silenced, for now. But could this be the start of a new political awakening among young people in the country?

Host Juana Summers talks to Yangyang Cheng, a Fellow at Yale Law School’s Paul Tsai China Center, and Professor Mary Gallagher, who directs the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan about why this is happening now.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Can Newly Elected LGBTQ Lawmakers Shift The Landscape For LGBTQ Rights?

The advocacy group Human Rights Campaign reports that in the past year, more than 300 bills targeting LGBTQ rights have been introduced by state legislatures around the U.S.

A recent NPR analysis shows that about 15% of those bills were signed into a law.

NPR’s Melissa Block breaks down the current landscape of anti-LGBTQ legislation.

At the same time, a record number of openly LGBTQ candidates were elected to public office across the nation this year. We hear from two just-elected state representatives: Zooey Zephyr, the first out trans lawmaker elected to office in Montana, and New Hampshire’s James Roesener, the first out trans man ever elected to a state legislature.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The (Literally) Cold War In Ukraine

Russian attacks have repeatedly targeted Ukrainian energy and heating infrastructure, threatening to leave millions vulnerable to the approaching bitter cold of winter.

Winter will also force both sides to change their tactics on the war’s frontlines. NPR’s Nathan Rott reports on what leafless trees and frozen fields mean for the battlefield.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How Abortion Bans—Even With Medical Emergency Exemptions—Impact Healthcare

Christina Zielke went to an ER in Ohio bleeding profusely while experiencing a miscarriage. This was in early September, before the state’s 6-week abortion ban was put on hold by a judge. What happened to her next is an example of how new state abortion laws can affect medical care in emergency situations.

Doctors who run afoul of these laws face the threat of felony charges, prison time and the loss of their medical license.

NPR’s Selena Simmons-Duffin reports that some doctors are asking themselves a tough question: when they are forced to choose between their ethical obligations to patients and the law, should they defy the law?

Selena’s story about Zielke is part of NPR’s series, Days & Weeks, documenting how new abortion laws are affecting people’s lives.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Pulling Back The Curtain On Our Climate Migration Reporting

For over a year, we’ve been working on a series of stories on climate migration that spans thousands of miles and multiple continents.

Our team of journalists saw firsthand how climate change is making places like Senegal less habitable. They saw how that’s pushing some people to places like Morocco, where they cross international borders in search of a better life. And how that migration is driving a rise in far-right politics in wealthier countries, like Spain.

We’re pulling back the curtain with a conversation about some of the moments that will stick with them, to give you a sense of life in the places they visited and take you across the world through your ears.

Hear and read the rest of our series on climate migration and the far-right.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

When Does Comedy Cross the Line?

Every time stand-up comic Dave Chappelle gets in front of a mic, he seems to reignite a debate over when, or whether, a comedian can go too far. Chappelle has been heavily criticized for jokes about gay people and the trans community. Most recently the comedian came under fire while hosting SNL. During his monologue, he made comments that critics say elevated longstanding, prejudiced tropes against Jewish people.

Can a joke become harmful, can comedy cross the line? Who decides what happens when that line is crossed?

NPR’s Eric Deggans speaks with Roy Wood Jr, a comedian and correspondent for Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, and Jenny Hagel, a writer and performer for Late Night with Seth Meyers and head writer for the Amber Ruffin Show on Peacock.

Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between Africa And Europe

There are two tiny patches of Spain on the African continent. One is a city called Melilla that’s surrounded by Morocco and the Mediterranean Sea.

The European Union has spent billions to keep migrants from sub-Saharan Africa from crossing the border between Morocco and the Spanish city.

This episode, we look at what that means for the people who make it through and for the city they arrive in.

This story is part of an NPR series on climate migration and the far-right.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.