What The Climate Package Means For A Warming Planet

Up until a few weeks ago, meaningful climate legislation was sidelined in the U.S. Senate. But after months of wrangling votes — and adding concessions to oil and gas companies — Democrats in the Senate have finally passed the Inflation Reduction Act.

The bill includes more than $300 billion in climate investments — the highest amount ever allocated by the federal government to tackle climate change. This episode lays out what the bill does, what it doesn’t, and tracks the ups and downs of the legislation as it wound its way through Congress.

This episode also features reporting by NPR’s Laura Benshoff looking at the ways the legislation incentivizes individuals to fight climate change in their everyday life.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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From The Grassroots To The Top Of The Ticket, Election Denial Looms Large in GOP

In Republican politics, one of the biggest issues in the 2022 election is the 2020 election. In at least 8 states so far, Republicans have picked candidates for Secretary of State who deny the results of the last presidential election. This is despite the fact that not a shred of evidence calls President Biden’s victory into question. If elected, they would become the chief elections officer in their states.

In some of the same swing states where election deniers will be on the statewide ballot in November, there’s another effort underway, backed by key figures in former President Trump’s orbit. Cleta Mitchell, a lawyer who worked on Trump’s effort to overturn the 2020 election, is working to mobilize an “army” of poll watchers.

NPR’s Tom Dreisbach reports on what he learned from leaked audio of one of her summits.

This episode also features reporting from NPR’s Miles Parks, who covers voting and election security.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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How The U.S. Gave Away Cutting-Edge Technology To China

Researchers at an American national laboratory spent years developing cutting-edge vanadium redox flow batteries. But now, a Chinese company is making those batteries in a factory in northeastern China.

An investigation from NPR’s Laura Sullivan and Northwest News Network’s Courtney Flatt shows how the U.S. federal government gave away American-made technology to China.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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The Course Of The War In Ukraine Hinges On The Fight For Kherson

All eyes are on Kherson. In Ukraine’s first major offensive of the war, soldiers are pushing towards the city, trying to retake it from Russian troops. It’s a transport hub and key river crossing, and reclaiming it would be a huge victory for Ukraine.

NPR’s Kat Lonsdorf brings us the story of Vitaly, a 22-year-old college student in Kherson. Since the city first fell, he has sent NPR voice memos detailing life under the Russian occupation. Now, he’s decided he has to get out.

And NPR’s Brian Mann travels near the front lines with Ukrainian forces pushing towards Kherson. It’s a vast stretch of half-abandoned villages and farms fields, old industrial sites and dense forests, where the exact point of contact between Russian and Ukrainian troops is often unclear day by day.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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Palestinian pop singer Bashar Murad struggles for freedom and equality on two fronts

Bashar Murad’s danceable riffs and live concerts and videos – filled with bubbles, enormous hats, and layers and layers of veils – have earned him the nickname “Palestinian Lady Gaga” from his fans. And much like Born This Way is an anthem of equality, Murad’s songs challenge conservative social norms and push for LGBTQ rights while also challenging the Israeli occupation of the West Bank.

Earlier this summer, Murad’s concert in the West Bank city of Ramallah was cancelled under threats by anti-LGBTQ activists. As an outspoken proponent of LGBTQ rights, Murad is challenging both the external conflict Palestinians face with Israel and the internal conflicts imposed by a conservative society.

This week, NPR’s Daniel Estrin speaks with Bashar Murad about his music, his activism, and how anti-LGBTQ events that unfolded during the summer have added to the complexities that can come with being a voice for both the Palestinian and the LGBTQ communities.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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As U.S. Declares Monkeypox A Public Health Emergency, What To Know About The Risks

This week the Biden administration declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency.

And as the number of cases in the U.S. continues to climb, there’s a lot of confusion about the disease, how it spreads and who’s most at-risk.

NPR health correspondents Pien Huang and Michaeleen Doucleff join us to discuss the current outbreak.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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The National Security Advisor’s Very Busy Week

With House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan, the U.S. airstrike that killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri and Russia’s ongoing war in Ukraine, there’s a lot to talk about with National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan these days.

He weighs in on all three in a sit-down interview with NPR.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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Abortion Bans Have Consequences For Wanted Pregnancies, Too

Since the fall of Roe v. Wade, a dozen states have implemented laws banning or severely restricting abortion. Those laws have consequences for wanted pregnancies, too.

NPR’s Carrie Feibel brings us the story of a woman in Texas whose pregnancy took a sudden turn. Because of the state’s abortion law, her case became a medical crisis.

This episode also includes reporting from NPR’s Sarah McCammon and Melissa Block

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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Al Qaeda Leader Killed In U.S. Drone Strike In Afghanistan

Ayman al-Zawahiri, the leader of Al Qaeda, was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan over the weekend. For years, al-Zawahiri was Osama Bin Laden’s deputy — and was known as the mastermind behind the 9-11 attacks.

NPR’s Greg Myre and Diaa Hadid discuss the implications of al-Zawahiri’s death for the U.S., Afghanistan, and America’s decades-long war on terror.

This episode also features reporting from NPR’s Steve Inskeep.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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Why We Will See More Devastating Floods Like The Ones In Kentucky

Dee Davis remembers watching his grandmother float by in a canoe during the 1957 flood that hit Whitesburg, Ky. The water crested at nearly 15 feet back then–a record that stood for over half a century, until it was obliterated last week.

The water was more than six feet higher than the 1957 mark when floodwater destroyed the gauge.

The flooding took out bridges and knocked houses off their foundations. It had claimed at least 35 lives as of Monday afternoon.

And it was just the latest record-breaking flooding event to hit the U.S. this summer.

NPR’s Rebecca Hersher explains that climate change is making extreme floods more frequent. A warming atmosphere can hold more moisture, which means, when it rains, it rains harder.

This episode also features reporting from NPR’s Kirk Siegler, KJZZ’s Michel Marizco and St. Louis Public Radio’s Sarah Fentem.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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