What Navalny’s Death Means For The Russian Opposition

Much of the world has spent the weekend mourning Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And asking why he chose to return to Russia, after he’d been poisoned, and when it was clear he was in danger.

Filmmaker Daniel Roher, who interviewed Navalny for the Oscar-winning documentary “Navalny,” says the Russian opposition leader was an incredibly optimistic and certain about himself and his mission. And that Navalny believed he could usher in a brighter future for Russia.

So what happens to that future now? Aleksei Miniailo an opposition activist and researcher in Moscow weighs in on how the Russian opposition sustains its movement after the death of its most prominent figure.

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A Second Wind For Wind Power?

About two years ago, New Jersey’s Democratic Governor Phil Murphy said that the state would be partnering with the Danish company Orsted, the largest developer of offshore wind projects in the world.

The company had agreed to build Ocean Wind 1, the state’s first offshore wind farm, powering half a million homes and creating thousands of jobs in the process.

The following year, Orsted inked another deal with the state for Ocean Wind 2, a second offshore wind farm with similar capacity. After years of review, the projects were approved in summer 2023. Construction of the first turbines was slated to begin in the fall.

And then Orsted backed out, cancelling the contracts full stop.

Despite the setbacks, Murphy is still all-in on wind. A month after Orsted dropped out, Murphy directed the state’s Board of Public Utilities to seek new bids from offshore wind developers. And the state just approved two new offshore wind contracts.

After several setbacks, could this mean a second wind for offshore wind?

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Rents Take A Big Bite

Rent has skyrocketed in the United States. That means Americans are handing over a bigger portion of their paycheck to their housing costs. They have less money for things like food, electricity, and commuting.

The pandemic and inflation have both played a role in pushing rents higher.

Whitney Airgood-Obrycki a Senior Research Associate at Harvard’s Joint Center on Housing Studies says rents are actually going down, but that increases have been so large it’s going to take time for the market to even out.

We look at how rent prices got so high and what it might take to bring them down.

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The Romance Between The American Right, Russia And Putin

For half a century, during the Cold War, every U-S president painted Russia as the dominant threat. America’s ideological opposite, a hostile and nuclear-armed power. Ronald Reagan went so far as to call the Soviet Union an Evil Empire.

So the events of recent days have been noteworthy. On top of a holdup of U-S aid for Ukraine, former President Trump said he might NOT come to the defense of a NATO ally who hadn’t spent enough on defense.

And Tucker Carlson, the erstwhile Fox news host, flew to Moscow to sit down with Vladimir Putin for more than two hours of mostly softball questions.

Afterward, he pronounced Putin “impressive” on stage at the World Government Summit.

So what gives? Why the romance between the American right and Russia?

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Immigration: A Winning Issue For Democrats?

One single election does not a trend make. But does Democrat Tom Suozzi’s victory in the special election for New York’s 3rd Congressional District mean something bigger for democrats?

The Congressman won his seat – which until recently had been held by disgraced Republican George Santos – by diving head on into an issue that democrats would usually rather avoid – immigration.

Was that the opening chapter in a playbook Suozzi is writing, for fellow Democrats trying to find a way to deal with the thorny political issue of immigration?

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Double Standard On Age For Trump And Biden?

On June 14, Donald Trump will turn 78 years old.

Joe Biden turned 81 in November.

Whether the candidates like it or not, age, mental acuity and physical fitness are issues dominating the 2024 election cycle.

Though the two men were born fewer than four years apart, voters have consistently expressed more concern about Biden’s age than Trump’s.

Is a double standard being applied when it comes to the presidential candidates and age?

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Are Biden And Netanyahu Breaking On The War Between Israel And Hamas?

The question looming over the war between Israel and Hamas is what will happen what will happen to Rafah, the city in southern Gaza. More than half of Gaza’s population has sought refuge there–an estimated one and a half million people.

Israel says that in order to defeat Hamas, it needs to bring the war to Rafah. The Biden administration says a military operation in Rafah cannot proceed. Is this a hairline crack or the beginning of a rift between the U.S. and Israel that could reverberate across the region?

President Joe Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanayhu’s visions for the future of the war in Gaza are beginning to look irreconcilable. What does that mean for Biden’s steadfast support of Israel?

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With A Second Term, Trump Would Take His Immigration Crackdown Further

Immigration is one of the main things Americans will be voting on in November. And many are currently unhappy with the situation at the US Southern Border, which is widely described as a crisis.

As Donald Trump runs for another term, he’s hoping to leverage that discontent just as he did in 2016.

An across-the-board crackdown on immigration was one of the signature policies of the Trump presidency. In a second term, he’s promising to go even further.

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What Makes A Football Movie Great?

Hollywood films have long tried to capture America’s obsession with its most popular sport. So on this Super Bowl weekend, we ask: what do the best football movies have in common?

Is it the “Big Speech” with the team down a point and only seconds to go? Or what about the classic underdog story?

Scott Detrow discusses that with Brittany Luse, host of NPR’s It’s Been a Minute, and with Stephen Thompson of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour.

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The Battle Over Abortion Rights In The 2024 Election

Abortion is a personal issue. But it’s also political. And few things motivate voters and politicians like abortion rights.

Over and over, U.S. voters have shown they’re willing to choose lawmakers, presidents and ballot initiatives based on how they feel about abortion rights.

We examine the role abortion could play in the 2024 elections.

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