The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A ‘Danger Point’

First New York, then the Sun Belt. Now, new states like Illinois and Mississippi are urging residents to wear masks and take the virus more seriously.

Bars remain one of the most dangerous places to be during the pandemic. Reporter Will Stone explains why, from Seattle.

While Michigan and New York saw similar spikes in cases near the beginning of the pandemic, New York has flattened the curve. Michigan hasn’t. Reporters Kate Wells and Fred Mogul discuss what lessons can be learned from the disparity.

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Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But ‘Normal’ Is What Got Us Here

After rising for weeks, the rate of daily COVID-19 cases in the U.S. has started to level off. But now, just as we saw in the spring, the country is facing a spike in deaths.

In the new issue of The Atlantic, two stories share the cover. One, by Ed Yong, is about the pandemic. The other, by Ibram Kendi, is about racism in America. Both ask the same question: how did it come to this?

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The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

Millions of students are getting ready to head back to school. Some already have. NPR’s Anya Kamentez reports on what happens when positive cases crop up — as they inevitably will.

School nurses understand the challenges of returning to school safely better than just about anyone. But NPR’s Clare Lombardo reports somenurses have no input in the process.

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Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

Rosa Brooks, law professor at Georgetown University, recently helped organize an experiment to game out what might happen if the winner on election night isn’t immediately clear. She explains what she found.

And NPR’s Sally Herships reports on cuts at the postal service — and concerns they’re politically motivated.

Garrett Graff wrote about how election day could go off the rails for Politico Magazine.

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The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

The spread of the virus exceeds our capacity to test, contact trace, and isolate those who test positive. Some public health experts say the only option that remains is a second shutdown. NPR’s Rob Stein reports on what that would look like.

Derek Thompson, writer and editor at The Atlantic, says there’s another part of our virus strategy we may need to rethink. He calls it ‘hygiene theater.’

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John Lewis Fought For Voting Rights His Entire Life. Why His Work Is Still Unfinished

John Lewis, the civil rights icon and late congressman from Georgia who represented Atlanta for more than three decades, spent his life fighting for equal voting rights in America.

Myrna Perez, Director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, explains why his work remains unfinished.

Lewis spoke to ‘Fresh Air’ in 2009. Listen on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

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First Phase III Vaccine Trial Underway, Government Seeks Thousands Of Volunteers

This morning in Savannah, Georgia, the first volunteer was injected in a phase-three vaccine trial administered by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Anthony Fauci hopes that up to 15,000 volunteers will be in place by the end of the week. (Tens of thousands more will be needed for additional vaccine trials.)

It will take months to learn if the vaccine produces an effective immune response. Scientists who’ve studied antibody reactions in coronavirus patients have reason to be optimistic, at least in the short-term.

And Dr Elke Webber, psychology professor at Princeton University, explains why the pandemic may be getting too big to wrap our heads around.

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