Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

The U.S. looks poised to exceed its summer peak, when the country averaged as many as 65,000 cases a day for a 10-day stretch in late July. The seven-day average of cases is now more than 69,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

The situation is similar in Europe, which just logged more new cases than any week so far.

Cases are rising in North Dakota faster than any other state. Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney recently imposed a mask mandate there.

NPR’s Will Stone reports on the growing outbreak in the Midwest, where some hospitals may not be able to handle an influx of COVID-19 patients.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

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As COVID-19 Cases Climb, How Safe Is It To Go Home For The Holidays?

On Friday, the U.S. hit its highest number of daily coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Holiday travel could lead to even more drastic and deadly spikes.

As cases surge throughout the country, many people are wondering how to plan for the holidays. Is it safe for kids to see their grandparents? Should people be gathering as usual for big Thanksgiving dinners? How should people travel — to drive or to fly?

You sent us your questions — and we put them to NPR’s Allison Aubrey and David Schaper, who reported out some answers ahead of a usually busy season for gathering and travel.

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How Much Do You Really Know About Your Flood Or Wildfire Risk?

Every year, millions of American renters and homebuyers make decisions about where to live. They have a lot of information to help them make a decision — about everything from schools to public transit to lead paint.

But what many never learn, until it’s too late, is that their homes are in areas that are increasingly prone to flooding or wildfires.

This episode contains elements from a special reporting project by NPR’s Rebecca Hersher and Lauren Sommer. You can read an overview of their reporting here. They also have advice for questions to ask about your property when it comes to wildfire and flood risk in a changing climate.

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Why More White Voters Aren’t Supporting President Trump In 2020

Polls show that Joe Biden has strong support among white voters with a college degree, especially white women, young voters, and those who live in cities and suburbs.

That support adds up to record support with white voters for a Democratic presidential candidate. Nearly half of white voters, overall, support Joe Biden.

NPR’s Sam Gringlas spoke with a few of them in battleground states. And NPR’s Domenico Montanaro explains why this shift fits a longer pattern of the Republican party losing college-educated whites.

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From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We’re Still Learning About The Virus

Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR this week that he’s “guardedly optimistic” about the prospects of a coronavirus vaccine being approved by the end of the year.

In the meantime, scientists are still learning new things about the coronavirus.

NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel reports on improvements in medical treatment for COVID-19 patients, and NPR’s Michaeleen Doucleff explains new research on air travel.

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Election FAQs: Postmark Deadlines, Ballot Security And How To Track Your Vote

With two weeks until election day and more than 35 million votes already cast, NPR’s Miles Parks and Pam Fessler answer your questions about voting, ballots and election security.

For more information on voting this year, NPR’s Life Kit has a guide to help you out. Read at npr.org or listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

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The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by.

The situation is especially dire for Latina women, as NPR’s Brianna Scott reports. Last month, out of 865,000 women who left the workforce, more than 300,000 were Latina.

Victoria de Francesco Soto of The University of Texas at Austin explains why it’s not just the pandemic economy hurting women. Some may be left out of the recovery, too.

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The Pandemic Bounceback Abroad: Concerts And Movies In Other Countries

While U.S. movie theaters continue to struggle, the picture is better for the international box office. NPR’s Bob Mondello, who’s reported on how domestic theaters are getting by, explains why things look more promising abroad.

A recent outbreak of the coronavirus in the Chinese city of Qingdao says a lot about how aggressively the country has adopted public health measures. Those measures have led to a return of some music festivals, as NPR’s Emily Feng reports.

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Pandemic ‘Halftime’: U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

As cases spike around the country, Utah is one state changing the way it’s approaching the coronavirus. Republican Gov. Gary Herbert has a “new game plan” to beat back record-high cases that threaten to overwhelm the state’s hospital system.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says “halftime adjustments” like that are necessary for states to slow the spread of the virus this fall, as more Americans prepare to spend more time indoors. An exclusive NPR survey of contact tracing efforts reveals many states are not prepared to handle the coming surge in cases. NPR’s Selena Simmons-Duffin explains.

And Dr. Anthony Fauci warns Thanksgiving gatherings may accelerate spread even more.

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The Politics At Play In Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Confirmation Hearings

With less than three weeks to go until Election Day, Republicans have the votes to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Her confirmation hearing is now much about the politics of the election.

Democrats, including Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, are focused on issues like the future of the Affordable Care Act. While Republicans, as NPR’s Melissa Block reports, are emphasizing Barrett’s motherhood in an effort to appeal to white suburban voters.

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